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Public event

Citizen Security: Diagnostics and Propositions from Latin America

Events

Citizen Security: Diagnostics and Propositions from Latin America

Date:                   Thursday, 20 March 2014, 12.30 -14.00    

Venue:                Room VII, Palais des Nations (Building A, Door 13, 3rd Floor)

Registration:      Registration closed for persons without a UN badge.

Programme

Introductory remarks

Neil Buhne, Director, Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery (BCPR), Geneva Liaison Office, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Sara Sekkenes, Advisor, Conflict Prevention and Recovery - Partnerships, BCPR-UNDP

Speaker

Javier Sagredo, Advisor on Democratic Governance and Citizen Security of Regional UNDP Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean (RBLAC)

Comments

Anna Alvazzi, Head Of Research, Small Arms Survey

Closing remarks

Achim Wennmann, Executive Coordinator, Geneva Peacebuilding Platform

Background

This lunch-time seminar presents and invites discussion on the key findings of the UNDP Latin America Human Development Report 2013-2014 “Citizen Security with a Human Face”. Specifically this lunch-time seminar focuses on the potential value of the lessons from Latin America to other violent and fragile settings including for instance the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region or in Africa or Asia.

The report represents a major multi-stakeholder effort to map trends in human security in Latin America and to identify recommendations for a safe Latin America. For instance, the report highlights so-called ‘iron fist’ policies adopted in the region have failed to achieve their objective of reducing levels of violence and crime. They have also had a deep negative impact on democratic coexistence and respect for human rights, which are at the heart of human development. Furthermore, in Latin America valuable processes have been developed to prevent and mitigate the impact of violence and crime, by means of strengthening the capacities of the State and encouraging active, responsible citizen participation. Experience also shows that interventions must be multi-sectoral and address both short term needs as well as the structural vulnerabilities that lie behind crime and violence.

The report also highlights the following trends in citizen security in Latin America:

  • The region registers more than 100,000 homicides per year.

  • In 11 of the 18 assessed countries the rate is higher than 10 murders per 100,000 inhabitants.

  • One in every three Latin Americans reported being a victim of a violent crime in 2012.

  • In all assessed countries, more than 80 percent of inmates did not complete 12 years of schooling.

  • Most countries with an urban population growth above 2% per year also reported increases in homicide rates.

  • Five out of 10 Latin Americans perceive that security in their country has deteriorated.

  • Without the excess mortality due to homicides the region’s GDP would have been 0.5 % higher.

 

Sandwiches, soft drinks and coffee will be available prior to the event.

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